Three Quick Reviews

Damn Good Advice (For People with Talent!): How To Unleash Your Creative Potential by America's Master Communicator, George LoisDamn Good Advice (For People with Talent!): How To Unleash Your Creative Potential by America’s Master Communicator, George Lois by George Lois
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

When one of the greatest ad man and art director in the history of advertising brings out a book called “Damn Good Advice”, hardly you can get your hands off it. George Lois is one of my big inspirations and this book gives a deeper understanding of his philosophy regarding the creative process that helped him yield years after years of great advertising.

When you’re reading this book, it feels like George is shouting down on your face. So, yeah, it reads like a charm. I finished the whole book in about one hour. It’s not that long but full of great wisdom for not just an ad guy, but anyone involved in a creative field.

Red DragonRed Dragon by Thomas Harris
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I only read ‘Red Dragon’ to be able to read ‘Silence of the Lambs’. I had no idea what the book was about or that I was going to encounter Hannibal Lector there in the middle of it! Goes without saying what followed certainly blew my mind.

Red Dragon is an engaging story, although the writing is a bit too omnipresent for my taste but the thrill makes up for it. It takes us into the deepest and darkest parts of human mind and shows us its true potential.

I enjoyed it and would have probably given it 3 and a half stars had Goodreads allowed!

Tao Te ChingTao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

That which cannot be reviewed isn’t good book. That which is a good book needs no review.

View all my reviews

Book Review: Low Town by Daniel Polansky

Book: Low Town (First of its Name and the First in the Series of the Same Name!)

Author: Daniel Polansky

Genre: Noir/Fantasy (i’m told)

First thing’s first. (For those who’ve read the book; if not, kindly skip to next para) Low Town is a flawless, smooth read. But I can’t shake off this feeling that how closely it reads out like a game console. You know what I mean. Just think about it. The Earl is the place where the game is saved (where Warden returns every night to rest). We get information/messages from Adolphus (while Warden happily chomps at his food) and we set out on various mission for the day according to that. We meet various people who interact with us and help up gather up bits and pieces of the whole story. We solve one mystery at a time and learn something new about the world with every small mission and by the end of the game we are so confident of our abilities that we are ready to take on the main boss. Only, the main boss turns out to be someone else — and someone very close.

Just a feeling. Whatever.

Low Town is one quirky read. You’d think after reading the likes of Mark Lawrence and Joe Abercrombie you’d get the hang of the grimdark side of things.

Nay, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to Low Town.

Low Town is a thrilling detective story done in a fantasy setting. It is a tale of disgraced hero (who only wants to peacefully sell his drugs) against the cruel law enforcers, selfish crime lords, immoral sorcerers, and useless nobles.

Firstly, I must take time to talk about the protagonist. Because he. Is. Simply. Awesome!

Meet Warden, ex-army and intelligence agent, who has fallen from grace and now is an infamous narcotics dealer. That in itself is one hell of a character trait to not get intrigued into. Add that to his charisma and you have a gem of a read. He takes the story to the whole new level. He’s funny. He’s quirky, smug, snappy, realist… and just plain smart. He reminds me of Mark Lawrence’s Jorg! Hell, I daresay that they are somewhat at par.

The story takes flight when a child is found murdered in the street, severely abused. One way or another, our poor hero gets thrown into the midst of things and before you know it he must now either solve the case of this children-kidnapping/killing or be prepared to be blamed for it. Luckily, he had been one hell of an agent before his fall from the ranks. His contacts as a drug dealer didn’t hurt either.

With every page, Polansky takes us an inch deeper into the secrets of the Low Town (and what a marvelous Worldbuilding this is!) and of our hero. Each page grips us more than the last. It only gets juicier when other-worldly creatures and sorcerers start playing their part and the whole story unfolds as an exhilarating adventure.

I have given it a solid five stars with only pitfall being that I could easily second-guess the culprit of the whole crime. Nevertheless, a rewarding journey!