Book Review: Fool Moon (The Dresden Files #2)

Fool Moon (The Dresden Files, #2)

 

 

 

 

 

Fool Moon by Jim Butcher

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Fool Moon is your typical “Harry Dresden” book. Pretty much enjoyable (and funny as anything!). Plus a lot of fangs, furs, snarls, and howls. Few things didn’t work for me, though. But in the end, who doesn’t love a good ol’ Wizard vs. Werewolf face-off, eh?

Harry Dresden is your modern day Wizard, and a pretty good one at that. With his magic, he tries to keep the creatures of Nevernever from creating havoc in the world. As a Wizard-at-hire, he invests most of his time assisting Police (Special Investigations) and Detective Karrin Murphy.

“Fool Moon” begins with Murphy requesting Harry to look at a case regarding bestial attacks on a few local gangsters. After much investigation (and a bit supernatural help), he concludes that the attacks have been done by some kind of supernatural Wolf-thingie.

He starts to dig in. And soon finds himself surrounded by all sorts of Werewolves (Butcher divides supernatural wolves into four categories — Lycanthropes, Hexenwulfen, Werewolf, and Loup-garou, which was something fresh in urban-fantasy). All of which, for one reason or another, want him dead.

But wolves are just that. Animals. Dogs. They don’t do organized crime or planned murders. (Or do they?)

Beaten, broken, and bandaged too many times to count, Harry Dresden must now find the real culprit — the one who let the dogs out (sorry, couldn’t resist).

All good so far. But for some reason, I didn’t like Harry Dresden as much as I’d adored him in the first book. Don’t get me wrong, he was funny and imperfect and everything else that made me like him in the first book. But this time, he somehow had developed this irritating habit of feeling too much sorry. Everything bad that happened was somehow his fault. Always.

I also hated the part where Murphy completely loses her trust in Dresden. I mean, Murphy has seen some pretty bad supernatural forces at work, and has taken Dresden’s help on more than one occasion. Now after working together on several cases, how can she (how can anyone!) ever doubt the one person who uses magic for all the right reasons?

It felt as if that thing was there only for the sake of adding one more conflict to the story. Ew. The book tries to get emotional but utterly fails (at one time, even crossing tacky-meter). Again, ew.

This is not one of the most fascinating tales you will ever read. And certainly not one of the best Harry Dresden (or Jim Butcher) books. But this will keep you entertained through the end.

Talk about the the silver linings.

View all my reviews

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